Monthly Archives: February 2017

The reason behind the incident is important

Fainting occurs when one’s blood pressure suddenly drops, resulting in a decrease of blood flow to the brain.

A number of things can affect blood pressure, from abrupt changes in posture (like going from lying down to standing), dehydration, and certain medications. Feeling faint can include dizziness, lightheadedness, and nausea. One’s field of vision may even “black out.” This loss of consciousness triggers a loss in muscle control. That’s what causes the person to fall to the ground.

One of the most common types of fainting is caused by a sort of crossed signal between the brain and the vagus nerve, a large nerve that runs from the brain to the stomach. When this nerve is overstimulated, a person may faint. In such cases, you can usually figure out the reason — maybe you were standing for a long time, fainted at the sight of blood, or due to some kind of emotional distress, trauma, or pain.

Some people faint because they’ve suddenly constricted their carotid artery (the artery in the neck) by turning their head abruptly or wearing a too-tight collar. Straining to make a bowel movement or even urinating can sometimes cause fainting, too.

Fainting can also occur in people who have hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, most common among diabetics because of fluctuating insulin levels. Dehydration can also cause fainting, particularly in the elderly. Certain types of medications, including

diuretics, heart medications, psychiatric drugs, antihistamines, and narcotics, can also trigger a fainting episode, as can alcohol.